White Snake Dream Interpretation


Aloha Dr. Howard,
I just woke up and the last dream I can recall was I was walking through an airport with a piece of rolling carry on luggage; and the luggage was designed to hold this white snake. I was transporting it for a friend. And every time I looked down at the snake it had extended its body a little and was getting closer to my hand. I eventually dropped the suitcase for fear of being bitten.

Earlier in the night, I had another dream that contained a white snake; but I do not remember what I was doing in the dream.

So I guess the snake is the star here. What is that all about?


Snakes are one of the most important symbols of primal energy of the psyche. It is sacred to the divine healer, Asclepius of ancient Greece, who has embodied the daemon of “genius” intertwined with a black and white snake on his staff. Snakes are hidden forces, often dark and cold. They often accomplish the miracle of cure. They are an ominous warning, an awakening of a primal energy in your psyche. A serpent is an emblematic, primordial life force. Your psyche is asking you to not only transport some primal energy that your friend has, but also to take ownership of that quality in yourself that you are you are afraid of.

Bitting in a dream has a double meaning. It is your psyche insisting that you ingest and not be afraid of some primal instinct that is emerging in your life. It is like an imprint or seal of spirit that wants you to recognize its place in your life. Or it can signify a sudden and dangerous action of an instinct in your life.

A state of whiteness indicates that some part of us is not living and remains in an abstract or ideal state. That part wants to be embodied into your life. Baptism or initiates wear white vestments of rebirth, for simplicity and restoration. White can also mean a cold force, like that of the mythic Snow Queen of the north. In Moby Dick the Great White Whale conveys the indefiniteness and impersonal vastness of the universe and the human fears of annihilation. Yet the milky maternal ocean of Hindu myth speaks of the source of all the fundaments of the cosmos. In alchemy the whiteness or albedo was conceived as a state of illumination of the dawning the unknown personality into consciousness. Birth this part of yourself.

Hope this helps,
Dr. Howard Teich

Intertwined Twin Kundalini Serpents

KUNDALINI SERPENTS – The two serpents intertwine as a symbol of the relationship between two opposites: the sun and the moon, on the cosmic level, and within the sacred physiology of the subtle body, the solar nadi and lunar nadi, as they are described in the texts of Tantric Hinduism. The opposites manifest themselves in the cosmos and within the individual psyche, and they reflect the complementary aspects of the divinity, out of which all things flow.

The two snakes in this image represent complementary forms of divine energy. The same forms are represented by the sun and the moon, the male and the female, heat and cold. Central in this symbolism is the notion of energy. In the Hindu worldview, the term for this energy is prana, which means “breathing forth.” It may refer to the Ultimate as the transcendent source of all life, to life in general, to the life force of an specific being, to respiration, to air, and to the life organs. It is the creative force that underlies and pervades all being. In this sense, prana is related to the Greek pneuma (“spirit”) and the Melanesian mana (“power”). All of these terms refer to an invisible force that moves and empowers cosmic life.

That this energy should be represented in two of its aspects by two snakes is not surprising, since the primary divinity involved in this ritual process is also depicted as a snake, that is, Kundalini. In the West, we tend to symbolize spirit as a bird, especially a dove or an eagle. In this way, we stress the freedom and transcendence of the spirit. However, the snake is also a common symbol for spirit, because it is believed to possess the powers of healing and immortality. Shedding its skin, the snake appears to undergo rebirth. Further, it is believed to have a special connection with the life-giving powers of the earth in which it dwells.

In his study of Kundalini, C. G. Jung emphasizes the value that the traditional spiritual disciplines offer the individual during the process of psychological development. The traditions provide both a symbolic context and the techniques necessary for integrating activated unconscious material (dreams, visions, physical symptoms, etc.). In his commentary on Gopi Krishna’s personal experience of the awakening of Kundalini within his own body, James Hillman restates the importance of an ideational context for psychological experience. “To our loss in the West, we are so lacking in an adequate context that we do indeed go to pieces at the eruption of the unconscious, thereby justifying the psychiatric view. Fortunately, Jung’s analytical psychology gives in its account of the process of individuation a context within which these events can be meaningfully comprehended. Fortunately, too, Jung studied as a psychologist this branch of yoga. He called the Kundalini an example of the instinct of individuation. Therefore, comparisons between its manifestations and other examples of the individuation process (e.g. alchemy) provide a psychologically objective knowledge without which there would be no way of taking hold (comprehending, begreifen) what is going on. Very often, therefore, it is of utmost value during a period of critical psychological pressure in which the unconscious boils over, to provide the sufferer with psychological knowledge” (Krishna, 95).